Florissant Heights Owners Association
FHOA events and information
Community awareness
Home
Maps
Photogallery
More Photos 2
More Photos 3
Local Links
Contact Us
Services
FHOA events and information
  
        

"Springtime in the Rockies!"  "Spring time is just around the corner!"  I'm sure all of us have heard these age old sayings. Although, it sure does seem that someone has moved the corner!!! I personally enjoy the snowy, cold winter, but everybody that I have talked to recently is not happy with Mr. Old Man Winter hanging around as long as he has. Oh, when he blesses us with new snow, it is so pretty, but, with it comes a lot of hard work for a lot of hardy people. Sidewalks, parking lots, driveways, all need to be plowed, and the sooner after the snow storm, the better. But with plowing driveways, also comes some responsiblity of the home owner to not push their snow out onto the county road, and leave a mess. An email was sent to the supervisor of the Teller County Transportation Department, to get some clarification on what is permissible, and what is not. Consideration for your neighbors is definitely an issue, but, as was learned from the response of the email, the property owner could be held liable for any property damage done due to them not cleaning up after they plow. Here is the responce received from the Teller County  Transportation Department.


"This is a link from our website. If you scroll to the 3rd page you can see what it says about pushing the snow across the road. It does say that if you leave any obstructions in a roadway you could be held liable for any property damages and that it is unlawful.

 The Transportation Dept. doesn’t have any problems with anyone pushing snow across the road as long as they clean up the berms. If berms are left in the road they will freeze and cause damage to our plows."

 

Here is the link being refered to. Copy and paste it to your browser and you can read the snow plowing policies in its entirity!

 

http://www.co.teller.co.us/PublicWorks/Transportation/SnowIcePolicy.pdf
  April 3, 2014

  _______________________________________________________

 



         

Throughout the eons of time, nature was given the means of keeping their specific species alive and flourishing. Today, those methods are called the survival of the fittest. Civilization has moved in and taken over a lot of the natural habitat of the native species. And being as they are, they have adapted to the changes. The deer roam aimlessly around, not too afraid of the invaders of their homeland. The beaver still builds dams, and survives even when uprooted and transplanted to another location. The elk have adapted, and can be seen in large herds grazing across our valleys and parks. The night animals have adapted well, also, yet do not relinquish their stealthfulness and mystery to us humans. Oh, we catch a glimsp of them every once in a while, but usually all we humans do is hear them in the middle of the night, singing their soulful songs as they invite others of their kind over for a bite to eat. The fox, the coyote, the puma, the cougar, the mountain lion, the owl, the badger, and the racoons, to name a few. It is sad to see a deer that has been killed, partially eaten by its predator, then left for the other scavengers of the night to feast upon later. But that is the way of the wild. Today, with the ground being all covered with snow and the temperatures colder than usual, we are seeing more and more of these night creatures moving about late in the evenings, and early in the mornings, scrounging for food.  We as the more intelligent ones, must be aware, and on the alert for just these kinds of animals. Take the cougar, for example. If Mother mountain lion hasn't eaten in a few days, and has little cubs depending on her for food, it is very likely that she will mistake one of our pets as a meal for her family.This is not unheard of. Very recently, just north of us, a human encroacher lost their family dog to a mountain lion. We need to be aware. Keep our pets near to us if we go on late afternoon walks, or early morning hikes. We have invaded their land, so we must alter our habits when there is a chance of encountering a wild beast of this nature. Please be aware, there are mountain lions living among us. And they can be dangerous when hungry or cornered!!                 Jaunary 16, 2014!




FHOA events and informationCommunity awarenessHomeMapsPhotogalleryMore Photos 2More Photos 3Local LinksContact UsServices